Archives: March 2011

Cell phone companies don’t know where you are. Really.

I dislike alarmist stories like this. Of course cell phone companies know where your phone is pretty much all the time. The phone wouldn’t work otherwise. This is not the same, though, as knowing where YOU are. We are not our phones. Amazingly enough, it is possible to set your phone down and go somewhere

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Nuclear Power Perspective

I was going to say something about the nuclear plants in Japan, but xkcd has said almost everything that I wanted to say in a graph. I feel compelled, though, to be a little more blunt, namely: EVERYTHING THAT HAS HAPPENED RECENTLY IN JAPAN HAS JUST SHOWED US THAT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS ARE THE SAFEST

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To intervene or not to intervene

The West is struggling to deal with the question of what to do, if anything, with Libya. Gaddafi is proving more difficult to oust than previously thought, which suggests without EU, UN, or U.S. military invention, the rebels will be able to do no more that hold eastern Libya, if that. So far Obama and

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Gingrich’s devil: patriotism

On one level, this is comedy gold – blaming excessive patriotism for extramarital affairs – but it’s also an interesting example of an almost completely ethos-based argument that appeals to fellow sinners. By the way, I can’t help but enjoy the  parallel between secular-atheist-elitism and radical Islam at the end. I would wonder if he’d

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The incommensurability of iphones and staplers

Interesting piece on Thomas Kuhn chucking an ashtray at a graduate student. It’s witty, but not really funny, as I have an big issue with the author’s seeming bewilderment with the term “incommensurability.” The endnote in the article ignores (or is possibly completely ignorant of) how the term has a long history that predates Kuhn,

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The subtle context of aircraft carriers

I was surfing around today, trying to get a feel for the political climate, and found this Wall Street Journal editorial on the decline of the U.S. Navy’s power. The central claim, which is made by a fellow at the conservative Claremont Institute, is that the number of ships in the Navy has declined drastically

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